Please Whitelist This Site?

I know everyone hates ads. But please understand that I am providing premium content for free that takes hundreds of hours of time to research and write. I don't want to go to a pay-only model like some sites, but when more and more people block ads, I end up working for free. And I have a family to support, just like you. :)

Please think about the value you get from this free site, and consider adding it to the whitelist for Adblock. To do so, just open the Adblock menu and select "Disable on freelancingguide.net". Or go to the Tools menu and select "Adblock Plus Preferences...". Then click "Add Filter..." at the bottom, and add this string: "@@||freelancingguide.net^$document". Then just click OK.

Thanks for your understanding!

Sincerely, Charles Kozierok
Author and Publisher, The Online Freelancing Guide


NOTE: Using software to mass-download the site degrades the server and is prohibited. Any such attempts may result in your access to the site being automatically blocked. Please be considerate of other readers -- and my server -- and thank you for your cooperation.

Custom Search






Table Of Contents  The Online Freelancing Guide
 >  Finding and Evaluating Online Freelancing Projects
      >  Specific Online Freelancing Project Warning Signs

Previous Topic/Section
Refusal to Use Escrow
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
3
Next Page
Special Circumstances and Considerations in Assessing Internet Freelancing Projects
Next Topic/Section

Specific Illegal or Unethical Requests
(Page 2 of 3)

Article Spinning

Creating quality content takes time and effort. Believe me, I know. :) Some webmasters don’t want to write their own material, nor pay a real writer to create it for them. So they take short-cuts by hiring “article spinners”. These “writers” (to use the term loosely) take existing articles and rearrange the words and sentences just enough so that the result looks unique, even though it contains no original thought whatsoever. The goal is to avoid showing up on plagiarizing-check services like Copyscape, and hopefully get a high search engine ranking.

Whether this is technically copyright violation seems to be controversial. That it is unethical and not anything a real writer should do, is in my opinion, pretty obvious.

Clones of Popular Sites

Requests for clones of popular websites show up on freelancing sites daily. There’s certainly nothing wrong with borrowing smart ideas, of course, but it is it of dubious ethicality to clone the entire appearance and/or functionality of a successful website. These projects nearly always have laughable budgets as well: there are people who actually think that they can create a duplicate of eBay for $200.

Ironically, one of the most common targets of these clone projects are the freelancing sites themselves. I can’t even count how many times I’ve seen “make a copy of Elance.com” listed on Elance.com.

Watermark Removal

Theft of images is rampant on the Web. As a photographer with his own gallery site for many years, I am often dismayed to find that my images have been taken without permission and duplicated in sometimes dozens of places, without even the courtesy of crediting me. And as bad as this is for artistic images, it is even worse for commercial photography and illustration: companies routinely steal large quantities of product photos and other images to use on their own sites.

One way that companies combat this is through the use of watermarks: small images or lines of text embossed across the images that identify the original source of the work. This gives credit to the actual owner of the image, and discourages theft, especially in a commercial context. Consider that the owner of OurWidgetsRAwesome.com will think twice about using widget photos that have “AwesomeWidgetsRUs.com” emblazoned across them.

Well, if the guy who runs OurWidgetsRAwesome.com is really unwilling to get his own widget shots, he has another option: hire a freelancer to try to edit the watermarks out of the other site’s photos. The end result is usually pretty awful, but people do it anyway.

Companies looking to have this done will of course not openly admit that they are stealing images. There is always a story behind it, such as “we changed ownership” or “it’s our new site name” or “my dog ate the source files”. I’m sure some of these stories are even true, but most are not, and I don’t think it’s worth taking the risk by helping out on such projects.

Another abuse of watermark removal comes from clients trying to get free work out of freelancers. They’ll take a sample that has been watermarked by a freelancer to prevent the work from being stolen, and then hire someone else to remove the watermark. They will always claim that they paid for the work but that they can’t find the source file. Again, you can’t assume they are lying about this, but a large percentage of them are.


Previous Topic/Section
Refusal to Use Escrow
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
3
Next Page
Special Circumstances and Considerations in Assessing Internet Freelancing Projects
Next Topic/Section

If you find The Online Freelancing Guide useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) Thanks for your support -- it's hard to make a living writing free material these days.
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

The Online Freelancing Guide (http://www.FreelancingGuide.net)
Last Site Update: February 1, 2012

© Copyright 2001-2012 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.