Please Whitelist This Site?

I know everyone hates ads. But please understand that I am providing premium content for free that takes hundreds of hours of time to research and write. I don't want to go to a pay-only model like some sites, but when more and more people block ads, I end up working for free. And I have a family to support, just like you. :)

Please think about the value you get from this free site, and consider adding it to the whitelist for Adblock. To do so, just open the Adblock menu and select "Disable on freelancingguide.net". Or go to the Tools menu and select "Adblock Plus Preferences...". Then click "Add Filter..." at the bottom, and add this string: "@@||freelancingguide.net^$document". Then just click OK.

Thanks for your understanding!

Sincerely, Charles Kozierok
Author and Publisher, The Online Freelancing Guide


NOTE: Using software to mass-download the site degrades the server and is prohibited. Any such attempts may result in your access to the site being automatically blocked. Please be considerate of other readers -- and my server -- and thank you for your cooperation.

Custom Search






Table Of Contents  The Online Freelancing Guide
 >  Finding and Evaluating Online Freelancing Projects
      >  Factors for Assessing the Quality of an Online Freelancing Client

Previous Topic/Section
Client’s Geographical Location
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
Next Page
Factors for Assessing the Quality and Suitability of an Online Freelancing Project
Next Topic/Section

Special Considerations for Working with Clients New to Freelancing
(Page 2 of 2)

Rate Expectations

Experienced clients mostly know what to expect when it comes to rates and bids for projects on freelancing sites. New clients do not, but despite this, they are rarely open-minded on this subject: they frequently come to freelancing sites with preconceived notions about what work is going to cost. Ironically, it sometimes seem like these prejudices are weighted at both extremes of the cost spectrum, with relatively few clients in the middle.

On the one hand, many clients come to online freelancing primarily—or even solely—based on the idea that they’ll be able to get work done cheap. Many of these are drawn to the industry by promises from “gurus” who tell them they can get work done just as well as if they hired a local contractor, but at a fraction of the price. When a client shows up with this attitude, it can be very difficult to convince him or her that here, as in the “real world”, you generally only get what you pay for. Sometimes new clients will listen to reason, but many of them will only get the message after they get burned by a cheap provider who messes up a project.

At the other end of the scale are the clients who think that the online freelancing world is just an electronic extension of conventional freelancing. They expect to pay around the same rates for work done online that they would hiring someone local to them. This sounds great: after all, online freelancers often complain about clients who won’t pay what they consider to be “fair market rates”. New customers who are willing to do so are thus a valuable commodity. And in fact, these clients do represent the best potential for a viable, lucrative, long-term relationship.

However, even here there can be issues. One is that even if a client shows up willing to pay a good rate for work, he or she is likely to quickly be bombarded by proposals from providers willing to do the job for half, or even a quarter of the price. Some clients will react instinctively by assuming that these contractors cannot do quality work for that price. However, the allure of getting a “bargain” is a very powerful one, and you may find that even with a new client, you will have to be persuasive if your bid is towards the upper end of the range that the client has received. You’ll need to explain, patiently and professionally, why the client is better off in the long run paying more for someone who is qualified than just going with whatever the lowest bid is.

Sometimes you may even find yourself being dismissed over a bid that the client considers too cheap! I’ve had clients who showed up on a site expecting to pay, say, $200 to get a particular job done, when I was willing and able to do the work (properly) for half that amount. I actually had to convince the client that I was a quality bidder, and could indeed do the work for less than he expected, because it just wasn’t that much work.


Previous Topic/Section
Client’s Geographical Location
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
Next Page
Factors for Assessing the Quality and Suitability of an Online Freelancing Project
Next Topic/Section

If you find The Online Freelancing Guide useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) Thanks for your support -- it's hard to make a living writing free material these days.
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

The Online Freelancing Guide (http://www.FreelancingGuide.net)
Last Site Update: February 1, 2012

© Copyright 2001-2012 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.