Please Whitelist This Site?

I know everyone hates ads. But please understand that I am providing premium content for free that takes hundreds of hours of time to research and write. I don't want to go to a pay-only model like some sites, but when more and more people block ads, I end up working for free. And I have a family to support, just like you. :)

Please think about the value you get from this free site, and consider adding it to the whitelist for Adblock. To do so, just open the Adblock menu and select "Disable on freelancingguide.net". Or go to the Tools menu and select "Adblock Plus Preferences...". Then click "Add Filter..." at the bottom, and add this string: "@@||freelancingguide.net^$document". Then just click OK.

Thanks for your understanding!

Sincerely, Charles Kozierok
Author and Publisher, The Online Freelancing Guide


NOTE: Using software to mass-download the site degrades the server and is prohibited. Any such attempts may result in your access to the site being automatically blocked. Please be considerate of other readers -- and my server -- and thank you for your cooperation.

Custom Search






Table Of Contents  The Online Freelancing Guide
 >  Finding and Evaluating Online Freelancing Projects
      >  Factors for Assessing the Quality of an Online Freelancing Client

Previous Topic/Section
Client Work History and Feedback
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
Client Communication Capabilities
Next Topic/Section

Percentage of Awarded Jobs

Clients don’t like to have their time wasted—just ask them and they’ll tell you. :) Unfortu­nately, some of them don’t have any problem with wasting your time as a contractor. One of the ways that this manifests itself is with projects that are posted on freelancing sites but never awarded.

Some of the more common causes of abandoned projects include the following:

  • The project was posted on multiple sites; the client found someone on one site but never closed the project on the others.

  • The client wanted to hire someone but didn’t find a candidate he or she liked.

  • The client posted the project without really understanding what was required, and never proceeded with the work.

  • The posting was only even intended to be a “reconnaissance mission”: the client put it up just to see what bids would be obtained, or to scope out how much it would cost to get the work done.

  • An error was made in the listing, and the job was relisted, but the old project was left in place.

As you can see, the reasons for unfilled projects can range from entirely reasonable to utterly inconsiderate. Nearly all clients who spend appreciable amounts of time on freelancing sites will have some projects go unfilled, but certain clients make a habit of this behavior, which is an unacceptable waste of a freelancer’s time.

It’s also a waste of the time and resources of the freelancing sites. Since most do not charge clients to post projects, every listing that goes unfilled costs the sites money.

To help alleviate this situation, many sites now keep track of the proportion of awarded jobs for each client. This is expressed as either the percentage of projects filled (where a higher number is better) or percentage unawarded (lower is better, of course). Ideally this infor­mation is shown right in each project summary in the site’s search results, but you might have to hover your mouse over the client name or load the project details to see it.

There are no magic numbers here, no percentages above or below which I’d recommend you make a hard and fast decision. But I generally get wary of clients whose awarded project percentage starts to get to the 50% or below range. A client whose award rate is below 25% is very likely to be a waste of your time, while 75% or higher is pretty good.

Incidentally, remember the flaws associated with percentages as applied to small numbers. A 50% award rate over 100 projects is pretty bad, but the same percentage over two projects is just one unawarded job, and likely doesn’t mean anything. Don’t judge new clients too harshly if their first couple of projects don’t work out.


Previous Topic/Section
Client Work History and Feedback
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
Client Communication Capabilities
Next Topic/Section

If you find The Online Freelancing Guide useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) Thanks for your support -- it's hard to make a living writing free material these days.
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

The Online Freelancing Guide (http://www.FreelancingGuide.net)
Last Site Update: February 1, 2012

© Copyright 2001-2012 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.