Please Whitelist This Site?

I know everyone hates ads. But please understand that I am providing premium content for free that takes hundreds of hours of time to research and write. I don't want to go to a pay-only model like some sites, but when more and more people block ads, I end up working for free. And I have a family to support, just like you. :)

Please think about the value you get from this free site, and consider adding it to the whitelist for Adblock. To do so, just open the Adblock menu and select "Disable on freelancingguide.net". Or go to the Tools menu and select "Adblock Plus Preferences...". Then click "Add Filter..." at the bottom, and add this string: "@@||freelancingguide.net^$document". Then just click OK.

Thanks for your understanding!

Sincerely, Charles Kozierok
Author and Publisher, The Online Freelancing Guide


NOTE: Using software to mass-download the site degrades the server and is prohibited. Any such attempts may result in your access to the site being automatically blocked. Please be considerate of other readers -- and my server -- and thank you for your cooperation.

Custom Search






Table Of Contents  The Online Freelancing Guide
 >  Introduction - Online Freelancing Overview, Options, Opportunities and Challenges
      >  Online Freelancing Career Options

Previous Topic/Section
Online Freelancing as a Complement to Traditional Freelancing
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
3
Next Page
Online Freelancing Styles and Trade-offs
Next Topic/Section

Full-Time Online Freelancing
(Page 2 of 3)

Transitioning from Full-Time Employment and Part-Time Freelancing

If you are new to freelancing, then the best way to get to full-time freelancing is to start out with part-time freelancing. If freelancing is a good fit, you’ll start to notice that your workload is increasing. At some point, you may find that you have more projects than time to do them, because of your full-time job, and might decide to leave the salaried position behind once and for all.

This is of course a decision not to be taken lightly. There are still risks, and by leaving your job you’re giving up a safety net that you may have grown more accustomed to having than even you realize. But again, as the saying goes: no guts, no glory. There is no way for most people to smoothly transition to full-time freelancing from a full-time job—at some point you just need that big chunk of hours to expand your business.

Here are a few considerations to keep in mind if you’re considering “going for it” after being a part-time freelancer:

  • Make Sure You’re Ready: Okay, it seems obvious, but as a guide-writer I still gotta say it: be sure you are ready before you pull the switch. Remember that there’s a big difference between working a few hours a week and working full-time. Consider just where your workload is, how much you’re earning freelance and how much more you will need to earn to replace your salary.

    Also, if you’ve gotten used to the extra money associated with working both for yourself and someone else, don’t forget that unless you’re making much more per hour than you did at your job, you’ll need to keep yourself busy beyond just standard working hours to maintain your income level. For example, if you earn $700 a week at a full-time job and another $200 freelancing, you need to move that $200 up to $900 to replace what you have right now. Alternately, you could stick to the $700 and perhaps get a bit of that free time back that you lost when you started freelancing part-time. :)


  • Consider a Trial Period: If you have the opportunity, consider a trial run at going full-time, by taking some time off and seeing if you can gather enough business to approx­imate full-time freelancing. This might be feasible if you have a good amount of vacation built up. Just be careful not to over-commit yourself…

  • Deal with Benefits: If you are relying on benefits that you get from your employer, what happens when you leave your position? Figure that out before you do anything.

  • Get Set Up for Full-Time Freelancing in Advance: Before you leave that job, make sure you’ve got everything you need for full-time freelancing set up and ready to go. If the little desk in the corner of your bedroom is not going to cut it for full-time work, or you think you need to talk to an accountant, deal with these issues up front.

  • Establish a Financial Buffer: Don’t strike out on your own until you are in a good financial position. Deal with any major debt issues before you get rid of that job. A cushion of money in the bank to help tide you over during those inevitable early dry spells wouldn’t go amiss either.

  • Consult with the Family: Yeah, them again: you needed buy-in from them to start freelancing part-time, but going full-time is a whole new ballgame. Make sure your spouse and any other significant “persons of interest” are all on board with the change before you do it.

Okay, my cautious nature is coming through again with most of these tips. What can I say? “Better safe than sorry” works for me. :) Remember that one of the big advantages of easing into this is that you do have the luxury of time—make use of it to get all your ducks in a row. This will greatly increase your chances of success.


Previous Topic/Section
Online Freelancing as a Complement to Traditional Freelancing
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
3
Next Page
Online Freelancing Styles and Trade-offs
Next Topic/Section

If you find The Online Freelancing Guide useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) Thanks for your support -- it's hard to make a living writing free material these days.
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

The Online Freelancing Guide (http://www.FreelancingGuide.net)
Last Site Update: October 21, 2011

© Copyright 2001-2011 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.